Art: Don McCullin

Hi Everyone!

https://www.christies.com/features/Don-McCullin-6777-1.aspx

How has your week been so far? Work has been slow for me and the weather has been pretty miserable in London, but I am grateful for some downtime. Moreover, I have something really exciting to look forward to this weekend! This probably also explains why I have mentally checked out at work. My university friend is getting married in Chamonix, France, so I am going to go snowboarding for the first time (last time was about 10 years ago so I will consider myself as a beginner again!) and see some friends that I have not caught up with since I graduated!

Last Sunday, I went to the latest exhibition at Tate Britain – Don McCullin, it will be available until 6th May 2019, for those with an Art Pass, it only costs £9 or £18 for a normal adult ticketI love the Tate group and I think Tate Britain is one of the most beautiful art galleries in London. I highly recommend wandering around the free exhibits if you ever have the time!

Don McCullin

I love photography exhibitions (see my previous post on Diane Arbus) and as I am still working on my own photography, I was excited about this specific exhibition. I did not know much about Don McCullin, so I thought it was a great opportunity for me to learn more about him and see whether his photos would inspire different techniques of my own.

For the past 50 years, he has travelled the world capturing the horrors of wars in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. During this period, he was shot and hit by a bomb in Cambodia; an individual was standing in front of him and took a majority of the shrapnel, unfortunately, the Cambodian male died shortly after. He has been imprisoned, expelled from a country and even had a bounty on his head. I am completely in awe of him – he had the courage and bravery to go where other photographers didn’t and, most importantly, he ensured that every photo he took was with compassion and respect.

He does not want to be known as a “war photographer” – just a photographer. Personally, I think he is much more than this; it really is no surprise that he is so critically acclaimed. He is described as a “legendary” photojournalist or “one of our greatest living photographers. I do not think my words in my post today will do justice in trying to explain how his photos made me feel – “impactful” had been used to describe his photography but I think this is woefully inadequate.  

“Photography for me is not looking, it’s feeling. If you can’t feel what you’re looking at, then you’re never going to get others to feel anything when they look at your pictures.”

Exhibition

The exhibition spans from his first photos that were printed in 1959 that captured the gangs (The Guv’nors) in North London, to most recently, the war in Syria. It is split out into 23 sections and I was very surprised how large the exhibition was, as it highlights McCullin’s extensive experience in capturing key moments in our modern history, in addition to, his more artistic photos of still life and landscapes.

When coming up to the exhibition entrance, note the disclaimer on the side. There are photos of deceased people and extreme starvation. I didn’t pay it too much attention and I thought that I was a tough cookie and could view the exhibition without too many issues. How very wrong I was! I was shocked myself that I could even give an outward display of emotion. Therefore, this is a warning to my readers: the exhibition is not for the faint-hearted, (this is also why I have not shared my favourite photos in the blog) be prepared to be moved to tears, particularly his work on the Biafra war.  My tears reflected McCullin’s astonishing skill as a photographer; he was able to capture emotions or “the moment” that seems to be unparalleled by others. My personal favourites were his portraitures where I found myself captivated by the individual and wanting to know and understand the story behind the photograph. Though the topics were heart-wrenching, McCullin did everything to capture the truth and let the photographs tell the story.

“Photography has given me a life… The very least I could do was try and articulate these stories with as much compassion and clarity as they deserve, with as loud a voice as I could muster. Anything less would be mercenary.”

Given the topics that are covered, it was obviously not an uplifting exhibition, but very much an important one. It was a stark reminder of how terrible we, as humans, can be to each other and it is a topic that we cannot, and should not, shy away from. It is photographers like him that tell the unheard story and forces us to face reality, take action, and learn from the past. One of the best quotes I have heard from a speech summarises this perfectly:

“We seem to be able to all agree on the future, but we always argue about the past” – Secretary-General of the UN, António Guterres.

I think that McCullin does just that. His photography is sensitive and poignant. I will revisit this exhibition before it closes in May. I managed to walk through the exhibition in an hour, but it was slightly rushed because I was meeting a friend after. There is a “slide show” nearer the end of the exhibition showing the photography that has been in The Observer and other newspaper outlets, unfortunately, I didn’t manage to sit through that.  I think for the second time around I am going to leave more time so I can enjoy the photos for longer. This is why this exhibition gets 5 out of 5 pineapples.

Have any of you been to the exhibition or have heard of Don McCullin? As always, I would love to hear your thoughts.

With Sweet and Sour Love,

Pineapple Chicken x

P.S. for those who want to learn more, there are other great reviews of the exhibitions in the link below:

 

Culture: The Sun – Living with our Star


Hi everyone!

How are you all doing? Are you looking forward to the weekend? I will be in Paris from Friday, so I am hoping for good weather and more photos to share with you on the blog :). Last Sunday, I visited the Science Museum’s exhibition – The Sun: Living with our Star. It has been running for a while and will continue until the 6th May 2019. For those who haven’t yet checked it out, you still have plenty of time!

Science Museum

I have not visited the Science Museum in South Kensington, London in many years. It is still one of the coolest places. It is a huge space and covers a vast range of topics. For those that don’t have a chance to visit London anytime soon, they have improved their digital resources and it is now possible to search and explore over 250,000 objects online.

Last Sunday was glorious. The weather was just perfect which is unheard of at this time of year, it was around 15 degrees Celsius and the sky was beautifully clear and blue. I managed to capture some pretty awesome shots outside and the lighting in the beautiful entrance hall.

The Sun: Living with our Star

The exhibition focuses on our nearest star – the Sun through objects, interactive videos and imagery. It is an in-depth study, starting with how it has been worshipped through history and how it is the centre of how time is measured on Earth. One of the coolest displays was a game on how to read sundials – this might sound silly, but I have never learnt how to read one, so now I know which I think it is pretty cool! Despite it being made for kids and we all now have watches and phones which tell the time…maybe in an apocalyptic scenario it might prove useful.

The exhibition then moves onto the next room to explain how the sun can impact our health. From being used to prevent/cure diseases such as Tuberculosis in Victorian times to the invention of sunlamps in the 1920/30s, through to the societal shift after the War, where people started to enjoy the healthy sun kissed looked and the rise of skin cancer since then. I spent a lot of time in this room as there was a lot of information dotted around and some vintage advertisements from different eras.

You can’t help to notice the “fake” beach setting with gold palm trees and some random deck chairs located right in the middle of the room. Guess it is made more for kids and potentially an Instagram moment?! I did appreciate; however, the constant background noise of the sea and seagulls; made me think that I need to plan a trip to the seaside soon!


The exhibition then moves on to how humans have been trying to harness the sun for energy. Given that I work in the renewables industry, this section was probably my favourite. It was awesome to see the beginnings of solar energy. Surprisingly, the use of fossil fuels and how it will eventually run out was already considered by the engineers of the Industrial Revolution, yet several hundred years on, we continue to use these pollutants as our main source of energy [Rant over]. One of the interactive exhibits was to try and bounce “sun rays” into a solar panel and light up a central light. It stumped me a bit, but I challenge anyone else to give it a go!

The final room of the exhibit explains the dangers of the solar storms caused by sunspots, with a focus on a storm in 1859, also known as the Carrington Event.

I knew nothing about this or the impact it would have on us today given all the technology we have. There is a very good video which explains the phenomenon in the exhibition, admittedly, made for kids, but very interesting nonetheless! There is also a game to try and save the Earth from future sun storms, I also challenge anyone to get full marks (I got 4 out of 5…clearly I was too risk-averse!).

The exhibition ends with a large room with awesome footages of the solar flares and sunspots. A vivid reminder of how small we are in comparison in the grand scheme of space and within our solar system.

Overall, it was an extremely informative exhibition and took me around an hour to complete. I highly recommend it for families as it is more catered for children. However, that is not to say an adult won’t enjoy it too (like me!). The exhibition gets a solid 3.5/5 pineapples!

I hope you enjoyed the little science snippets of the day as it is slightly different from the usual art and culture on the blog. I would love to hear from you, so do leave a comment below!

With Sweet & Sour Love,

Pineapple Chicken

Travel: Rotterdam

Rotterdam 2019

Hi everyone!

Happy Friday! What wonderful things have you planned for this weekend? Or will it be super relaxing focusing on self-care? Either way, I am very glad that I am finally back on the blog. For those who had seen my recent post, the blog was on pause because I was moving in with my boyfriend!! Thank you for all the well wishes from friends and readers – I was extremely grateful for all the messages.

I am not going to lie, the past week has been a bit of a rollercoaster! I had forgotten how stressful moving can be and I do not think I managed my own expectations and the change appropriately. The move in day coincided with one of the most sociable time of the year for me because of Chinese New Year and as a result, this has meant I have not actually spent much time in my new home.

HAPPY LUNAR NEW YEAR. 

May the Year of the Pig bring everyone good health, positivity, good luck and prosperity!

I am really excited to share with you my weekend away to Rotterdam with my sister.

Where we stayed

The James Hotel is a three-star boutique hotel. It looked like it had been newly renovated, with a sleek contemporary design. My sister and I shared a twin room, which was luckily upgraded to a larger room. I was extremely chuffed, however, we realised a large room does not the size of the bed changed! They seemed to be particularly small, which was a bit odd. I would recommend others to book a king size bedroom instead of twin beds.

They also seemed to have sprayed quite a distinctive “perfume” into the rooms, so if you have a sensitive nose, this might not be the place for you.  Despite this, it was conveniently located around good restaurants and the shopping district so there was a lot to see! I would recommend the hotel mainly for the location, cleanliness and friendly staff. (3 out of 5 pineapples)

Museum Voorlinden

The raison d’etre for going all the way to Rotterdam was to visit Museum Voorlinden. Noted that museum was actually nowhere near Rotterdam but in the Hague; and that my sister and I decided to fly all the way to London to visit this place – you can imagine how high my expectations were.

I was actually blown away – I had such an amazing time that I would fly back to Rotterdam just to see what other exhibitions they might hold in the future. Currently, they have two exhibitions, in addition, to their permanent collection:

  1. Less is More (until November 2019)
  2. Armando (until 10th March)

I highly recommend the Less is More exhibition, I have taken a few pictures of my favourite pieces (check out my Instagram feed) including Alicja Kwade Trans-For-Men 8 (Fibonacci), 2018. Brilliantly curated and just shown in such a wonderful space. The architecture of the building meant that there was a wonderful light flowing into each room.

My sister and I really wanted to see Leandro Erlich’s Swimming Pool which specially designed for Voorlinden. As the museum was not crowded, we managed to have at least 20 minutes taking photos with this wonderful art piece which would have been IMPOSSIBLE in London. This piece of art was such a tranquil space, so much so that I was wondering how I could have my own little pool at home so I could have a zen room hehe 😉 (It continues to be a dream).

I had a wonderful time – flying to Rotterdam and going to the museum really made my trip! (5 out of 5 pineapples)

Tip: If I was to visit again, I think I would stay in the Hague, there is a lot more to see and I found it much prettier than Rotterdam. 

What we did

  • Markthal – This is a food hall very conveniently close to the shopping area in the Cool District. There are a variety of stalls ranging from seafood to Indonesian food to Tapas. There is something for everyone, however, it did get very crowded in the evening. Personally, because of all the choice, it was very difficult to decide on what to have. I recommend going there with a cuisine or dish in mind, or you might end up wandering aimlessly like me. There was a dessert shop which sold Poffertjes – these amazingly buttery and sugary mini pancakes. They were SOOO GOOD – definitely try some whilst you are out there! (2.5 out of 5 pineapples)
  • Cube Houses – I am not sure why this is a recommended destination on most guides for Rotterdam. These are located right next to Markthal, so whilst you are there, why not go to see it but don’t expect anything special! (1 out of 5 pineapples)

Where we ate

  • The Fish Market – very chilled out vibes and an extensive seafood menu. Everything was very fresh and well executed. The portions were also very large, so I recommend ordering to share, or if you can go with a big group that would be even better! 3 out of 5 pineapples
  • Dudok – turns out there are few Dudok cafes in Rotterdam/Hague. There is one about 3 minutes from our hotel. We went there for breakfast on Saturday morning and it turns out that everyone else thought the same idea. Super popular with a mixed crowd. It was slightly odd that people seemed to have cake and coffee in the morning, but I could understand why because the apple pie is to a must try! 3 out of 5 pineapples
  • Restaurant Napoli – it was a cold weekend so wanted a bit of comfort food. This small little Italian place was SUPER busy, that we were only able to get a reservation on Saturday for 8:30pm. Delicious comfort food particularly if you are in a pasta mood – highly recommend this bustling restaurant. 3.5 out of 5 pineapples
  • by Jarmusch – American style diner that is super popular for brunch – great pancakes and had an awesome veggie breakfast. Expect there to be a relatively long wait, but was a great way to start the day! 3.5 out of 5 pineapples. 

Until next time

Rotterdam is filled with so much more to see. I didn’t even cover 20% of the locations I had on my google maps. I would have wanted to spend more time in the Hague, so next time I think I will stay there. The weekend trip was a great taster of what Rotterdam has to offer. As mentioned previously, I would go back just for Museum Voorlinden so I might use that time to wander around this more, and maybe not in winter because it was constantly raining whilst we were there!

Have any of you been to Rotterdam before? What do you think I should do next time whilst I am there? As always, I would love to hear from you!

With Sweet & Sour Love,

Pineapple Chicken x

 

 

An apology and revival!

To my dearest readers,

I cannot believe that it has been so long since my last post. I wish I could give an awesome excuse as to why I stopped writing – like trying to save the world and didn’t have enough time to go on the internet. However, as some of my followers on Instagram knows, this is an absolute lie.

Unfortunately, life happened and, very much so, a lack of self-discipline. One of my best friends moved away from London (due to the draconian immigration laws in the UK) so I spent most of it trying to share time with her (this is not an excuse btw). She was also my inspiration for my blog and re-introduced me to the world of art and culture through the Art Pass.

I had forgotten how much I loved all this stuff and how much London has to offer. The blog was to get me off my butt and do something different. Whilst my best friend is wandering the beautiful streets of Paris, I have been inspired to post on my blog again because I really love sharing my experiences with you all. If you can share a bit of love and beauty in this world – that can’t possibly be a bad thing.

Therefore, I would like to say SORRY to all my readers. I don’t think I should make any more promises, as I feel I will be lining myself for failure. Maybe we should all try and bet how long I can keep this up for! Do leave a comment below, I would love to see the range of guesses 🙂

Though I have not been blogging, it does not mean that I have not been keeping busy! Below is a quick round-up of all the exhibitions I have been to in 2018 and that is currently still open. Take a deep breath – this is going to be a whistle-stop tour!

  • Royal Academy of Arts (RA)
    • Charles I: King and Collector, available up to 15 April SO HURRY!!!!. 4/5 Pineapples. It is the first time since the 17th century that all these pieces have been reunited. It provided an extensive look into how art was shaped during the time of Charles I, and it is always great when there is a bloody history as part of the story.
  • Southbank Centre, Hayward Gallery
    • Andreas Gursky, available up to 22 April 2018 (SO HURRY). 4.5/5 Pineapples. Again, being a budding photographer, I always get excited about photography exhibitions. Gursky is famous for selling one of the most expensive photos in history. If you google it, it does not look like much … but the size of his works and the detail – truly phenomenal. It is also located in the spacious Southbank Centre, which is always worth visiting for its Brutalist architecture. This was one of my favourite exhibitions this year.
  • Natural History Museum (NHM)
    • Venom: Killer and cure, available up to 13 May 2018. 3.5/5 Pineapples. This was an interesting exhibition and the first time I have seen that there is a live animal on display. There are some really awesome animals in the collection and I always learn loads 🙂
    • Wildlife Photography of the Year, available up to 28 May 2018. 4.5/5 Pineapples. I love this exhibition and I go every year so this might be a biased review but this year there is a great portfolio of photos.
  • Barbican Centre 
    • Another kind of life:  Photography on the Margins, available up to 27 May. 5/5 Pineapples. This was one of the most humbling experiences. I went very early in the morning and it was so quiet and I think it resulted in a very different experience. The exhibition was just truly beautiful and curated very well. There are a variety of photographers on display, I probably should write a separate post on this for those who are interested. but ultimately, it was really worthwhile – a true eye-opener. This was also one of my favourite exhibitions this year.

You have done it, you have reached the end! Now you can breathe out 🙂

As you can see, it has been a busy first quarter of 2018 and I really looking forward to sharing it with you all. Next stop will be Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern.

Until then, with Sweet & Sour Love,

Pineapple Chicken x

Art: Jasper Johns

Hi Everyone!

I had recently visited the latest Royal Academy of Arts exhibition: Jasper Johns “Something Resembling Truth”. It is currently still on and will be available until the 10th December. An adult ticket is £17 without donation but the ticket price does include audio guides for those are so inclined to use them!

I have not actually heard of this artist before until a friend mentioned that he was going to have a look. As always, I would jump on any opportunity to expand my knowledge of art and culture. When I googled, and saw the iconic paintings the US flags, I realised who I was going to see! Having said that, because of my lack of knowledge of this artist, I wasn’t very sure what I was in for!

This is the first comprehensive survey of the work in the UK and it was an extremely large exhibition. I personally thought it was beautifully curated and the artwork was chronologically ordered. Each room you walked through was of a different decade. Obviously, to be difficult, I started with his latest work from the early 2000s and then making my way backward in time to the 1960s. I am glad that I did because I think it provided a different perspective on how his work developed. It was notable, how it became more vibrant and sophisticated over time, though admittedly more and more abstract.

There are some obvious reoccurring themes throughout his works, but my favourite pieces were definitely the recent paintings, which seemed to have a more Picasso feel; or the really early works with different materials, such as the Painted Bronze (ale cans) and The Critic Sees (1961).

Overall, it was a very well curated exhibition with a lot to see. For someone like me who was unfamiliar with his work, it was an eye-opener. However, personally, I am not a massive fan of his work and often found it difficult to emotionally engage with his art. Though, if you are a fan of his artwork, this is not an event to miss! As a result, I would give the exhibition 3.5 pineapples out of 5.

I would love to know your thoughts of this artist and whether you have had a chance to go and see the exhibition! Please leave your comments below 🙂

As always, with sweet & sour love,

Pineapple Chicken x

Culture: Imperial War Museum

Hi Everyone! Welcome to another instalment to the Pineapple Chicken Blog. I hope all my readers in the UK enjoyed a great bank holiday weekend! I had a few adventures so I am going to split up the days into several posts so I do not inundate you with too much information :)!

Imperial War Museum

First stop was the Imperial War Museum (“IMW”), the closest station being Lambeth North on the Bakerloo Line. I went to museum specifically to see the People Power: Fighting for Peace which has unfortunately closed on the 28th August. However, I thought that I would share with you what I saw and encourage you to visit the museum for all the other exhibitions.

I had never been to the museum before (despite living in London for 28 years) and was thoroughly impressed. It is housed in a beautiful building and it is amazing that it is possible to fit in a relatively small space! You walk through a beautiful park to reach the entrance where you come face to face with these two massive naval guns and ammunition shells (see photos above). If you keep walking around, you will also spot a piece of the Berlin Wall.

Once you enter the museum (please note they do bag checks), I was blown away by the sight in front of me. There were fighter jets, spitfires and other planes artistically displayed, dangling from the ceiling! The IWM is also not as crowded as other London museums making it a much more tranquil experience. You can wander the floors in your own pace and reflect in peace.

All temporary exhibitions are located on the 3rd floor, so my sister and I took the lift straight up to for People Power: Fighting for Peace. Unlike other museums, the ticket did not require us to enter at a specific time slot. The ticket was just valid from 10am (when the museum opens) and we were allowed multiple entries into the exhibition, which I must admit is the first time I have seen! (It is a very nice change!)

The exhibition explored how different peace movements influenced the perceptions of war. The main historical periods covered started with the First World War, moving to Second World War, to the Cold War and present day. It told the stories of individuals who stood up to conscription (conscientious objectors), who organised marches, and even one man’s decade long fight for peace (Brian Haw). It was a real eye opener for me because it is not an area that I had ever explored and thought much about. However, it is very relevant to all the threats that we face today, especially with the current tensions between American and North Korea.

Through all the paintings, letters, banners and even music, it gave an insight into the struggles of the anti-war protesters and gave reflection on what it must have felt like being a pacifist during a particular period. One particularly letter that stood out, was when a friend during the First World War wrote to a conscientious objector and called him a “livered cur”! Personally, I thought it was a humbling experience and wished that I went to see to the exhibition earlier to encourage you all to visit!

During my visit at the IWM, I also took an opportunity to visit a free exhibition. Sergey Ponomarev: A Lens on Syria. It is the first UK exhibition from the photographer. I highly recommend a walkthrough, especially if you love photography. The exhibition, however, is not for the faint-hearted, though the photos are not graphic (i.e. gore-y) it was heart wrenching for me to see the suffering of other individuals. There are two parts to the exhibition. First is “Assad’s Syria” which gave insight into how people lived in government controlled areas of Syria. Second, “The Exodus” covered the stories of families and individuals who sought asylum in Europe. This really hit close to home and was very humbling.

In my opinion, the IWM is a gem and often overlooked when people visit London or even living in London. I encourage everyone to stop by if they have a chance to wander through the free exhibits, if not, the temporary exhibitions. The IWM gets a well-deserved 4 starts from Pineapple Chicken!

There is also a new exhibition at the IWM, Age of Terror: Art since 9/11 which will be available until 28 May 2018. I hope to be able to go back again really soon to cover the Age of Terror and wander through the other floors.

Next up on the blog will cover my second day of the bank holiday – Richmond Park and some food reviews! Can’t wait to share with you all!

With Sweet and Sour Love,

Pineapple Chicken

Tickets to the exhibition cost me £5 with the Art Pass

 

Science: Whale Exhibition at the Natural History Museum

Hi Everyone! Welcome to another fun filled adventure on the Pineapple Chicken Blog. This post is especially close to my heart as it covered all my shenanigans my 28th birthday. As per tradition, I do not work on my birthday and took the day off. Luckily, my sister was also able to join me in my wanderings.

Palm Vaults, Hackney

First stop, I visited the most instagrammable cafe in London. I would honestly say that it was love at first sight! Pink and with hanging plants in pots, just my idea of heaven. The staff are super friendly and given that I was there around 12pm on a Tuesday the atmosphere was chilled. A great way to start the day.

They are famous for their smoothie bowls, so I ordered the mango smoothie bowl with blue algae. It was surprisingly not too sweet and refreshingly cold. If only the London weather was warmer! My sister ordered their banana cake topped with coffee mascarpone and cocoa nibs. Though sweet, the texture of the cake was dense and moist.

Accompanying my smoothie, I ordered the “layered matcha” drink. I had no idea what I was expecting but I really enjoyed it. My sister gave a scrunched-up face of dislike. It came iced and when mixed together became this rather unappetising grey/purple colour, (I am really not selling it!) but tastes of a refreshing matcha latte. I loved it and I would recommend it as a good alternative to coffee. My sister ordered an iced latte – good coffee, no complaints.

Though, Palm Vaults was out of the way for me, I really loved it there and it gets a smashing 4/5 pineapples from me. For the first time, I believed in the hype, so much so that my sister bought the t-shirt!

Temple of Hackney (Seitan), Hackney

Whilst I was already in the area, I thought I would go to the Temple of Hackney to try their vegan fried chicken. Yes, VEGAN! When I mentioned this to my colleagues the next day, everyone just gave me a “Gross”/”Yuck” comment, but that is because they are all meat eaters (haters!). I, on the other hand, am grateful that there is a restaurant out there trying to accommodate vegetarians and vegans need for fried chicken tasting things!

When we walked over from Palm Vaults (10 minutes), there was a queue outside of shop. The few seats out in the front were also filled with patrons. Clearly, there is a very loyal following. I spent a lot of time looking the menu. It was diverse, ranging from burgers to wraps to just the meat itself. They have chicken wings and pops with a variety of sides. This is definitely an attempt to being the real deal and not your average Chicken Cottage!

I decided to go for the 2-piece meal (fries and a drink) with a side of gravy as this is what I would have normally ordered when I was a meat eater. I was excited and anxious to see how seitan would taste as a meat alternative. For those who are unaware of seitan, it is made from wheat and has been used in many Asian dishes as a mock meat. I have had it in very traditional forms of cooking in Hong Kong temples but this is the first time I have had in a fast food context. It has been nearly a year since I have had fried chicken, so you can imagine how I was feeling (wiping the drools)!

I was disappointed with the food – I am sure I am upsetting many loyal patrons, so I would like to apologise in advance. Firstly, the gravy – do not order it. It was extremely watery and tasted like salty water. Considering I had paid £1 for a very tiny pot, it was not a good start. The size of the chicken pieces was large so you are getting your money’s worth. The batter was crispy but lacked texture – it was just a thin covering and the seitan, though flavoured was just a poor substitute. It is extremely dense and after a few bites, I gave up because I ended up chewing for too long. The fries were good, but I don’t think I need to go to a vegan fried chicken place for good chips.

I am glad that I tried because I have wanted to for a long time. However, I left disappointed and will not be going back any time soon, therefore, it only gets 1 pineapple out of 5 from me. (I apologise that I don’t have any photos of the food, I forgot to save the photo from instastory – FAIL)

Whales: Beneath the Waves – Natural History Museum

The grand finale of the day is visiting the Natural History Museum for their new whale exhibition to celebrate the new Blue Whale display (who has replaced our beloved Dippy the Dinosaur). The Natural History Museum is my favourite place in the whole of London, I have joined as a member and loved the fact that I can go to certain exhibitions for free and skip the long queues to get in! Personally, I think it is worth every penny and it is supporting an institution that pioneers in research, education and conservation (all my favourite things!).

I have seen part of the Whales: Beneath the Waves exhibition when I attended the launch party of the new Blue Whale display in the Hintze Hall (see some photos on my instagram) but didn’t have a chance to go all the way round. This time, dragging my sister along, I was looking forward to the rest of the exhibition. Though it was not as large as I hoped it to be, it was very informative. It is suitable for all ages filled with interactive activities and videos – it wasn’t just a bunch of skeletons and some letters on a wall.

The most memorable feature was the display showing the gestation stages of a whale. It was so bizarre and I was convinced that it was fake until my sister assured me that it was the real deal! They were perfectly formed but could fit onto a size of an A4 piece of paper. Mind-blown! Another impressive feature was the skeleton of the Thames Whale that sadly died in 2006.

I really enjoyed myself and I think the Natural History Museum did a great job of using other media to bring whales to life. It gets a solid 4 out of 5 pineapples. I left with a big smile on my face and an AWESOME retro baseball styled tee with a whale on it!

The exhibition is available until the 28th February 2018 and an adult ticket costs £11.50 online.

Until next time…

I am just organising all my photos but I hope to post about my day trip to Paris (and the shopping I did!). I have some exciting adventures this bank holiday weekend! AHHHH can’t wait to share that with you all as well. I hope you all have a wonderful week 🙂

With Sweet & Sour Love,

Pineapple Chicken x

  1. Do comment below if you think that there is anything I should visit or you would like me to review! (: